patience, it’s a thing.

via

So I’ve had a million and one thoughts running through my head over the last few months and have, regretfully, not taken the time to sit and type them so I’m starting with this little adventure that has been sitting with me since April and will do my best to pick up from there!

Back in April, I went on a little trip to Miami to present with some wonderful ADPi sisters. It was a quick trip, left on a Thursday, came back Friday night and that Saturday I was flying up to Boston to spend a little less than 48 hours with my momma. That may give you a little time of the crazy travel crunch I was in. (I felt like a Sister of the Suitcase again)

We were roughly 15 minutes from the airport but if you’ve ever lived in a city like Miami, you know that a 15-minute drive can take much longer. It took us 45. Needless to say, I was having a mini-anxiety attack as we were driving to the airport and mentally preparing myself for what would happen if I missed my flight. I was flying into a smaller airport and ya’ll know how difficult it can be to get to one after a missed flight.

We arrive at the airport about 45 minutes before my flight. I’m like great, I have no bags to check, the security line is short, this will be a piece of cake. I get through security and still have 30-35 minutes to spare, but I realize that signage for my Terminal was NOWHERE to be found. Now that panic is starting to creep up again. I asked an airport employee where the Terminal was and he says, “Oh, it’s wayyyy down there. Walk that way and when you eventually see this store, you’ll make a left.”

Great. Here I am still wearing my name tag, heels, and presentation outfit walking as fast as I can. If you’ve been to the Miami airport, you know that it’s pretty big, too. I end up seeing a shuttle sign to my terminal before I see this store so I hop on it and follow the signs to my gate. I’m thinking, yes! I’m going to make it. Well, I head up to take yet another train to my terminal but when I head to the stop, there is no one around. I head back down an escalator to ask an employee and she sends me in a different direction. As I’m walking that way, I quickly realize that she misheard me and head back to where I was. I wait for this train again for what feels like forever (it was 4 minutes) and hop on it. When I get to the terminal, there is NO ONE around. Stores are closed, it looks like it hadn’t been used in a while. It’s about 15 minutes until my flight is about to take off. I start to panic.

I RUN back to the train which luckily hadn’t left yet, hop back on, and look at a monitor only to realize the gate on my ticket was incorrect! At this point, I’m panicking and angry. How could it have been wrong on my boarding pass when it was so close to the flight? I run to the gate and at this point, it’s the time my flight is supposed to leave. I know that I missed it and realize that everyone is looking at me like I’m a crazy person for running back and forth. I walk up to the gate agent and say, “I missed the flight didn’t I?”

“We can get you on!”
I AM BEYOND RELIEVED. At that moment, those were the best words I’d ever heard in my life. I hand him my boarding pass which he scans and says “This is the wrong one, do you have the one for this flight?” I had been looking at the wrong gate THE WHOLE TIME. In my anxiety, panic, and impatience, I didn’t take the time to read my boarding pass to ensure I was going to the right place. In all that frustration and hurry, I let myself nearly miss my flight after running past the correct gate 4-5 times. Had I taken the time pause, breathe, and stay calm, I would’ve realized my mistake from the beginning or avoided it altogether.
So why am I sharing this with you? I think it served as several important reminders and lessons for me, but the biggest one was this:
We can’t always control everything that happens in our life, and that’s okay.
What you can control is how you think, feel, and react to it. At that moment, I did exactly what I shouldn’t have done. I didn’t trust the process or control my emotions. I allowed myself to be overwhelmed with the situation, therefore, causing me a lot of unnecessary stress.
I think this is something that is so easy to forget when we’re in the workplace, volunteering, taking on leadership roles, and even with ourselves. This somewhat simple(but also really hard to actually do) concept can save us a lot of grief, help keep a positive environment, help us maintain relationships with our colleagues/peers, and keep us motivated in our own growth and development.

I’m sure you all have experienced something similar to this life lesson at some point, but I hope this helps serve a reminder for you like it did for me.

Patience is a thing and I’m working on it. Everyday.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s